Policy Themes

  • AFRICAN POLITICS AND ECONOMICS AND THEIR IMPACT ON ARTS AND CULTURE

    Pictures on Africa are still conveying some pity. France 24 showed militaries patrolling in Northern Côte-d’Ivoire on 20 April 2011. Children were seen running to them and playing with Kalachinikov. A month before Laurent Gbagbo was toppled, Ivorian Radio and television, RTI, showed the minister of Youth. Charles Blé Goudé was calling up children to enrol in the army in order to fight Ouattara forces. Nobody perceives the danger, in spite of abuse and post-traumatic psychological disorders in Liberia and Sierra Leone. When it is time to provide all children with exercise books, text books and pens for quality education in Côte-d’Ivoire, television channels acclaim conflicts in their rush for audience and register children in war schools.


  • CULTURAL DIVERSITY WORKING GROUP

  • CULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT WORKING GROUP

    Lack of Arts Councils in African countries shows the lack of commitment to art and culture activities. On 14th January when there was cultural unrest in Uganda over proposed demolition of the Uganda National Museum, many people were upset, both Ugandans and Non Ugandans. But were we shocked by the proposal?


  • INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY WORKING GROUP

    This working group is facilitated by Theodore Nganzi and Serman Chavula


  • INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUE AND CULTURAL DIPLOMACY WORKING GROUP

    Johannesburg, also known as Jozi, is the largest city in South Africa, by population. Johannesburg is the provincial capital of Gauteng, the wealthiest province in South Africa, having the largest economy of any metropolitan region in Sub-Saharan Africa. The city is indeed is a melting pot. Being a South African city, Jozi houses diverse cultures of South Africans that have migrated to the city in search of opportunities dating back to the apartheid era.